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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
of extra heap trapped each day is equivalent to the energy released by 400,000 hiroshima atomic bombs every day. that's a lot of energy, even on a big planet. and one of the things that does is it evaporates more water off the oceans which puts more water vapor into the sky, 4% more in the last 30 years, and then when that waterfalls, either as rain or snow, it comes in much larger downpours, which causes larger floods. the winds get stronger. the storm, the storms are more intense, the sea level is up. all those things converged on sandy. but the very fact that there is 4% more water vapor in the atmosphere, not just above the place where the raindrops fall, you know, you have a bathtub filled with water, you open the drain, the water going down the drain just come just from the part of the tub directly above the drain t comes from the whole tub. and when there is a storm that it stretches out 2,000 kill 3450e9ers, often, and funnels toward the downpour so look what happened today they had two and a half feet of rain in queensland, okay. all over the-- pakistan, 20 million -- >> had to you
to energy, and help mike do manly things, like wrestle bears and take out the garbage. one a day vitacraves for men. [ female announcer ] for everything your face has to face. face it with puffs ultra soft & strong. puffs has soft, air-fluffed pillows for 40% more cushiony thickness. face every day with puffs softness. face every day i played a round of golf.id in the last five hours? then i read a book while teaching myself how to play guitar; ran ten miles while knitting myself a sweater; jumped out of a plane. finally, i became a ping pong master while recording my debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. >>> yesterday i gave you a big speech about buying the pullbacks. you've got to be there. even though every time an actual pullback arrives, your first instinct is to sell, possibly to panic. in this forgiving market, though, you need to resist that urge and start putting your money to work. take this dip in hain celestial, down 2.3% off a quarter seen not good enough. hain is a host of brands, eart
.50 billion. >> that is all for 11 news tonight. [captioning made possible by constellation energy g >> jay: hey, bar, that godaddy super bowl commercial you did was great. it was one of my favorites. >> thanks, jay. that's so sweet. >> jay: hey, i'm thinking. any chance we could re-create the ad, you know? >> sure. pucker up. [ laughter ] [ cheers and applause ] ♪ >> announcer: it's "the tonight show with jay leno," featuring rickey minor and "the tonight show" band. tonight, jay welcomes -- tim mcgraw! from the godaddy super bowl commercial, supermodel bar refaeli. and "ridiculous 911 calls." and now, jay leno! [ cheers and applause ] captions paid for by nbc-universal television captions by vitac www.vitac.com ♪ [ cheers and applause ] >> jay: thank you very much! thank you! welcome! welcome to "the tonight show." nice to have -- thank you very much. [ cheers and applause ] hey, you know -- here's something you never think about. you know, before the super bowl was played, you know, they make up the super bowl champion jerseys and hats for both teams. they make thousands of them for
of that great anxious energy that you feed off of. it's just, you know, been there enough times that this is my fifth super bowl n this case. you know, i'm in a stage of my career where i want to enjoy it, you know, i know i can do it, i want to really enjoy it and i think it makes you a better broadcaster. because you know, i think the best sports commentators are the ones who have perspective like charlie rose. bigg picture of the world. like you can read all the media guides you want. but i mean i would rather read about all things, you know, that may have nothing to do with this game. i want to know about new orleans. i want to know about the culture, the cuisine, the people. and i think that breadth of knowledge gives you, i think, the kind of perspective you need at a network level. >> rose: everything we've done on this program today preceding you has been about that, the culture, the city, the place. what this means to them. >> uh-huh. i get it here. i lived here. ri have lived in a lot of different places as a kid. my mom and dad would take up, my dad would get promoted, working for a
it was that you saw in beasts of the southern wild. >> i saw an extraordinary energy and imaginative free do. i mean one thing that-- because it's an independent movie, a small scale, you know, low budget kind of seat of the pants production. and so many of the movies that have come out recently that fit that template are very kind of somber and grim and kind of literally realistic, and about sort of the missery and struggle of people in trouble. and this one was so magical, and so imaginative it had alof thatkind o, you know, social conscience and neorealist exploration but also this sense of really the only word i have is magic. and it went, it kind of invented this world and got so wonderfulfully inside the consciousness of this child, you know t reminded me of the first time i ever read huckleberry finn. the child's perception as sort of wise and also innocent and organizing how the world looks and how it pite be and how you want it to be and taking terrible taj dee and dep riffation and disaster and turning it into something that was joyful. >> it reminded me, he called the film spielbergi
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)